Eric Pickersgill from UNC-Chapel Hill visits his billboard Outlet, in the NCMA park. See all three billboards from the 2013 Park Pictures competition in the park through the spring!

Eric Pickersgill from UNC-Chapel Hill visits his billboard Outlet, in the NCMA park. See all three billboards from the 2013 Park Pictures competition in the park through the spring!

A handful of the 30 art majors from St. Augustine’s University that contributed to one of the winning Park Pictures billboards visited their artwork in the NCMA Park! Billboards will be up through April 2014.

The winners of the 2013 Park Pictures billboard competition (minus Noelle Casimo) at College Night! Eric Pickersgill and some of the 30 art majors from Saint Augustine’s University who won this year’s competition. 
Their billboards will be up in the Museum Park in early November.

The winners of the 2013 Park Pictures billboard competition (minus Noelle Casimo) at College Night! Eric Pickersgill and some of the 30 art majors from Saint Augustine’s University who won this year’s competition.

Their billboards will be up in the Museum Park in early November.

The Park Pictures winners are…..



(from top to bottom)



  • Eric Pickersgill, Outlet, UNC-Chapel Hill
  • Noelle Casimo, Reclaimed, Elon University
  • Collaborative art piece, Expensive Tastes, St. Augustine’s University



Congratulations winners! Our associate curator of modern and contemporary art will be contacting you soon with more details.



We will be celebrating ALL Park Pictures artists at our annual College Night on Friday October 25! College Night is free with a college ID and includes live music, dance performances, entrance into the Porsche by Design exhibition, food, activities and more!

After you’ve gone
Minjin Kang
UNC- Chapel Hill
Artist Statement: In this picture I am capturing an estate sale, also known as a tag sale. Estate sales take place when someone needs to sell his or her items because of death, divorce, bankruptcy, or moving. Tags are hung on all of the items, and everything is sold in a first come first serve manner. Whenever I go to an estate sale, I am always surprised at how many wine glasses we need for living. How many items do we need? I want to show over consumption. We buy something for living and then other people sell it after we’ve gone. Do we really want that? Through this work I am expressing my opinion on conspicuous consumption and my desire for people to have more of a conscious relationship to consuming objects.
Artist Bio: I am currently living in Chapel Hill, NC. I am a 2014 MFA Studio Art candidate at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. I received my BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2011.

After you’ve gone

Minjin Kang

UNC- Chapel Hill

Artist Statement: In this picture I am capturing an estate sale, also known as a tag sale. Estate sales take place when someone needs to sell his or her items because of death, divorce, bankruptcy, or moving. Tags are hung on all of the items, and everything is sold in a first come first serve manner. Whenever I go to an estate sale, I am always surprised at how many wine glasses we need for living. How many items do we need? I want to show over consumption. We buy something for living and then other people sell it after we’ve gone. Do we really want that? Through this work I am expressing my opinion on conspicuous consumption and my desire for people to have more of a conscious relationship to consuming objects.

Artist Bio: I am currently living in Chapel Hill, NC. I am a 2014 MFA Studio Art candidate at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. I received my BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2011.

The Wieners Circle 
Mijoo Kim 
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Artist statement: I believe that photography should say something, should have meaning, and should be socially enlightening. I am particularly interested in understanding and representing people’s lives in various parts of our society. In this case, my inspiration came from contemporary realism at this time. I captured the scene; woman is staring at the glare of the light in The Wieners Circle. We live in the world of consumerism and materialism that is the characteristic of urban life, but sometimes people feel isolated. I derived the inspiration from Edward Hopper and Brian Ulrich. This scene reflects the realities of society in these days. 
Artist Bio: Mijoo Kim is currently pursuing her MFA Studio Art at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  She received her BFA from The School of Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC) in 2009.  She believes that photography is the best medium for converting my inner curiosity of the world into manifestation. 

The Wieners Circle

Mijoo Kim

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Artist statement: I believe that photography should say something, should have meaning, and should be socially enlightening. I am particularly interested in understanding and representing people’s lives in various parts of our society. In this case, my inspiration came from contemporary realism at this time. I captured the scene; woman is staring at the glare of the light in The Wieners Circle. We live in the world of consumerism and materialism that is the characteristic of urban life, but sometimes people feel isolated. I derived the inspiration from Edward Hopper and Brian Ulrich. This scene reflects the realities of society in these days.

Artist Bio: Mijoo Kim is currently pursuing her MFA Studio Art at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  She received her BFA from The School of Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC) in 2009.  She believes that photography is the best medium for converting my inner curiosity of the world into manifestation. 

Discontinued
Sara Pezzoni
Florida State University
Artist statement: This photo illustrates the concept of anti-consumerism and portrays a sense of detachment from the material world. Just as Brian Ulrich’s work portrays the bleak reality of the effects of excess in the American consumer culture, this photo represents resistance against consumerism disguised as a seemingly innocent symbol used to target the vulnerable and impressionable. American consumer culture is geared towards an endless need to attain “things,” to the point where we are spending so much of our time fixating not on the objects consumed, but on the act of consumption itself. Toys introduce consumerist behaviors early on in life and are especially damaging to a developing young mind, merely exploiting children’s emotions by promising instant gratification. Toys are also designed to be accumulated and flaunted, but for what? The level of satisfaction we are all striving for is never achieved, despite what large corporations convince us to believe.
Artist Bio: I am an experimental photographer striving to see the world differently. I was born and raised in Raleigh, NC and I’ve recently graduated from UNCW with a BA in Communication Studies and minor in English. I am currently pursuing a Master’s in Library Science online at Florida State University in hopes of becoming a photo archivist. I worked for UNCW’s school newspaper, The Seahawk, and I’m now working as a part-time news photographer for The Free Press in Kinston.

Discontinued

Sara Pezzoni

Florida State University

Artist statementThis photo illustrates the concept of anti-consumerism and portrays a sense of detachment from the material world. Just as Brian Ulrich’s work portrays the bleak reality of the effects of excess in the American consumer culture, this photo represents resistance against consumerism disguised as a seemingly innocent symbol used to target the vulnerable and impressionable. American consumer culture is geared towards an endless need to attain “things,” to the point where we are spending so much of our time fixating not on the objects consumed, but on the act of consumption itself. Toys introduce consumerist behaviors early on in life and are especially damaging to a developing young mind, merely exploiting children’s emotions by promising instant gratification. Toys are also designed to be accumulated and flaunted, but for what? The level of satisfaction we are all striving for is never achieved, despite what large corporations convince us to believe.

Artist Bio: I am an experimental photographer striving to see the world differently. I was born and raised in Raleigh, NC and I’ve recently graduated from UNCW with a BA in Communication Studies and minor in English. I am currently pursuing a Master’s in Library Science online at Florida State University in hopes of becoming a photo archivist. I worked for UNCW’s school newspaper, The Seahawk, and I’m now working as a part-time news photographer for The Free Press in Kinston.

Untitled (Trash)
Katy Mixon
UNC - Chapel Hill
Artist Statement: This series of photographs were taken in Venice, Italy as part of an action series performed by the Casanova Collective. Our goal was to document the city with our bodies, particularly the areas that go unnoticed in similarly populated centers, by drawing attention to Venice’s overt consumer culture and the residue generated from consumption. Because Venice is an island, the city’s infrastructure operates in plain view of its inhabitants. The influx of commercial goods and disposal of waste are especially visible. Venice is a floating microcosm where the perils of tourism, like the high pollution level of Venetian waterways, are difficult to ignore. It serves as a poignant example, especially to the North Carolina park system, of the direct and detrimental consequences consumerism can place on the natural environment.
 
Artist Bio: Originally from Orangeburg, SC, Katy Mixon is one of three artist who comprise the Casanova Collective.  Mixon also has a singular studio practice in Chapel Hill, NC, where she is currently an MFA student at UNC, Chapel Hill.

Untitled (Trash)

Katy Mixon

UNC - Chapel Hill

Artist Statement: This series of photographs were taken in Venice, Italy as part of an action series performed by the Casanova Collective. Our goal was to document the city with our bodies, particularly the areas that go unnoticed in similarly populated centers, by drawing attention to Venice’s overt consumer culture and the residue generated from consumption. Because Venice is an island, the city’s infrastructure operates in plain view of its inhabitants. The influx of commercial goods and disposal of waste are especially visible. Venice is a floating microcosm where the perils of tourism, like the high pollution level of Venetian waterways, are difficult to ignore. It serves as a poignant example, especially to the North Carolina park system, of the direct and detrimental consequences consumerism can place on the natural environment.

 

Artist Bio: Originally from Orangeburg, SC, Katy Mixon is one of three artist who comprise the Casanova Collective.  Mixon also has a singular studio practice in Chapel Hill, NC, where she is currently an MFA student at UNC, Chapel Hill.


Reclaimed
Noelle Casimo
Elon University
Artist Statement: Our world has become so consumed with everyday luxuries that we tend to become oblivious to the natural world. This “Open” sign was found in an old gas station, overgrown and taken back by weeds. Gasoline is an integral part of our society, and the fact that this station is closed and literally reclaimed by the natural world brings to light the fact that as much as consumerism has become a part of our world, the natural world will always be present, even when human presence is absent. Brian Ulrich’s project, Dark Stores, relates to my photography with the theme of abandonment present in both his photos and my own. I am interested in exploring how the natural world retains its beauty through consumerism, and even how it recovers when we can no longer consume and continue to suppress the living earth around us.
Artist Bio: Noelle Casimo is a Clearwater-born, Charlotte-raised artist in her senior year of the art undergraduate program at Elon University. Her conceptual focuses in her work include mental illnesses and abandonment as displayed by the interaction of the natural world and modern luxuries. Her main medium loves include photography and sculpting with clay. Noelle is an aspiring art therapist with a deep love for working with children with special needs.

Reclaimed

Noelle Casimo

Elon University


Artist Statement: Our world has become so consumed with everyday luxuries that we tend to become oblivious to the natural world. This “Open” sign was found in an old gas station, overgrown and taken back by weeds. Gasoline is an integral part of our society, and the fact that this station is closed and literally reclaimed by the natural world brings to light the fact that as much as consumerism has become a part of our world, the natural world will always be present, even when human presence is absent. Brian Ulrich’s project, Dark Stores, relates to my photography with the theme of abandonment present in both his photos and my own. I am interested in exploring how the natural world retains its beauty through consumerism, and even how it recovers when we can no longer consume and continue to suppress the living earth around us.

Artist Bio: Noelle Casimo is a Clearwater-born, Charlotte-raised artist in her senior year of the art undergraduate program at Elon University. Her conceptual focuses in her work include mental illnesses and abandonment as displayed by the interaction of the natural world and modern luxuries. Her main medium loves include photography and sculpting with clay. Noelle is an aspiring art therapist with a deep love for working with children with special needs.

All of nature in conversation.  We’re not invited.  So we wreck the party.
Laura Perry
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Artist Statement:  Humans and nature engage in a relationship which grows exceedingly odd as society’s view of progression, largely centered around industry, capitalism and its consumer/materialistic culture as a byproduct transcends the natural order of the environment we are bound to; a complex relationship which can partially be summarized by the concept of an ever advancing civilization liking the idea of nature, but not its actual presence and essence. 
Artist Bio:  Laura Perry graduated in 2013 from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a BA in Studio Art. Her work reflects her attention to line, color, and detail, with an emphasis on organic movements throughout the composition. She is both an abstract painter and a photographer, often blurring the lines between the two. Recently, her expressions have crossed over into the realm of installations, which she constructs and then manipulates through photography to capture what is truly envisioned. Common elements found throughout her work include themes discussing the abstract nature of our collective perceived reality, time and space, and the general continuum in which all things, elements, and events are interconnected and in which we all exist.

All of nature in conversation.  We’re not invited.  So we wreck the party.

Laura Perry

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Artist Statement:  Humans and nature engage in a relationship which grows exceedingly odd as society’s view of progression, largely centered around industry, capitalism and its consumer/materialistic culture as a byproduct transcends the natural order of the environment we are bound to; a complex relationship which can partially be summarized by the concept of an ever advancing civilization liking the idea of nature, but not its actual presence and essence. 

Artist Bio:  Laura Perry graduated in 2013 from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a BA in Studio Art. Her work reflects her attention to line, color, and detail, with an emphasis on organic movements throughout the composition. She is both an abstract painter and a photographer, often blurring the lines between the two. Recently, her expressions have crossed over into the realm of installations, which she constructs and then manipulates through photography to capture what is truly envisioned. Common elements found throughout her work include themes discussing the abstract nature of our collective perceived reality, time and space, and the general continuum in which all things, elements, and events are interconnected and in which we all exist.